The 2015 motion picture Concussion brought to light a grave concern that threatens football players of all skills and levels. Disturbing statistics and research have revealed that a large number of those who played football during high school, college and professionally have suffered from numerous concussions and are at a significant risk of developing a degenerative brain disease, which may cause symptoms similar to early-onset dementia and eventually result in death. Football players in Nevada and elsewhere may suffer from other debilitating injuries, in addition to head trauma.

Officials from the National Football League recently held a news conference to discuss injury data among its players. The topics that were addressed revealed concerns that prompted some to call football a brutal and highly risky sport. The sheer scope of strikes to the head, which frequently result in multiple minor and serious concussions for players throughout their careers, became evident during the discussions. During an average NFL game, a player may suffer a blow to the head by hitting his helmet against that of another player or by being tackled and hitting the ground. Ligament and joint damage, particularly to the knees and shoulders, is also common among football players. These injuries may be career-ending and result in permanent pain and immobility.

It is important to note that NFL players are not the only ones who face serious injury risks. Medical data has revealed that many former players who participated in football in high school or college suffered from complications related to head trauma and other injuries later in life.

Source: The New York Times, “Mounds of Injury Data Can’t Bury Brutality of the N.F.L.,” Michael Powell, Jan. 26, 2017