A person may decide to file a civil complaint in a Nevada court for a number of reasons. For example, compensation may be available for someone who suffers a physical injury or loss because of another’s negligence, a breached contract, defamation of character or other such matter. The Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada explains that this claim is typically seeking damages, protection of rights or an injunction. The defendant can then file an answer or another type of response to the plaintiff’s claims.

Before the matter goes to court, both parties spend time sharing the information they have about their case during the discovery process. Using this knowledge, they begin gathering evidence, including witnesses who are able to verify the claims they are making or defending. If the defendant believes he or she may fare better through a settlement rather than going to court, the plaintiff may have the opportunity to negotiate satisfactorily during the pre-trial stage. If not, a case may go to trial, where a judge or jury hears both sides and then makes a decision based on the evidence.

According to the Supreme Court of Nevada, a party who believes that there was a legal error made during the trial process may file an appeal with the district court’s clerk. This must be done within the time limit, and must include who is taking the appeal, what the judgment is and which court the appeal is taken to. The appellate court that reviews the case will then determine whether the original judgment should be reversed, modified or affirmed.