The word “justice” may call to mind the concepts of fairness and lawfulness, and when you file a lawsuit in Nevada, you should expect the court to uphold them. The American Bar Association explains that one of the processes in civil litigation, discovery, includes rules for making sure you and the other party each have the opportunity to address every issue in the case so that the outcome is fair.

When you are the plaintiff filing a lawsuit against someone for wrongdoing, it is your job to prove that the other party caused you harm in some way. However, even though it may seem counterintuitive, there should not be any surprises when you get to court. Discovery requires you to provide the respondent with all the evidence you plan to present, as well as any information that he or she requests that is within the scope of the trial.

By the end of the discovery process, both you and the respondent should have all relevant evidence so you can each prepare responses. The result, if the process goes as it should, is that you can evaluate all the facts and present the best possible case in court. Because you speak first as the plaintiff, the discovery process is particularly helpful in allowing you to address the things that the respondent will say before he or she says them. Although this explanation of discovery is intended to help you gain a better understanding of the civil justice system, it is not a substitute for legal advice.