Smartphones provide myriad distractions for drivers in Nevada, but advances in technology may help people to fight these temptations. For example, a group of Colorado-based technology entrepreneurs has created a special device that can connect the smartphone to the cloud after being plugged in underneath the steering wheel. This device, named Groove, lets the phone provider know that the user is driving; blocks incoming texts, social networking updates and emails; and prevents the driver from sending messages or posting on social media.

Those who text the phone will receive a notification that the recipient is driving. All messages and updates appear after the car is turned off. Groove does allow for music streaming and navigation since these are considered safe. However, parents could customize the device so that their teens are prevented from using these features.

Cellcontrol, a Louisiana-based company, has also produced a solar-powered device called Driver ID that blocks all social networking updates as well as access to addictive video games like Pokémon Go. It is mounted on the windshield below the rearview mirror and, unlike other devices, can differentiate between drivers and passengers’ phones. Cellcontrol offers drivers and administrators a report after each trip, which measures the driver’s speed and acceleration and braking times. These devices and other technologies are available but as yet not widely marketed.

Whether drivers wish to utilize such technology is up to them. When they cause car accidents because of distractions, though, they provide victims with the grounds for filing a personal injury claim. Victims can retain a lawyer to build up their case and negotiate for a fair settlement with the auto insurance company. An attorney could hire investigators, photographers and other experts to find proof of negligence and factor in any negligence on the victim’s part. If negotiations fall through, a lawyer could litigate.