Certain dog breeds have an aggressive reputation. But do the numbers back up the perceived likelihood that an animal will bite? 

Review the research and learn more about seeking financial recovery after a dog bite injury. 

Dog bite studies 

Forbes cited federal dog bite data from 2005 to 2018. Over those 13 years, pit bulls caused 66% of the 430 dog bite fatalities in the United States. In contrast, rottweilers were responsible for about 10% of these incidents. In third, German shepherds caused 5% of fatal attacks. The study notes, however, that even a dog breed considered gentle, the Labrador retriever, fatally attacked several humans during the study period. Other breeds on the list include mixed or unknown breed, American bulldog, mastiff, husky, boxer and Doberman Pinscher. 

Relevant Nevada laws 

Although some cities pass laws restricting ownership of certain dog breeds, state law in Nevada prohibits municipalities from making these types of restrictions. In addition, Nevada does not have a specific dog bite law and defaults to the “one bite” rule. Under this common regulation, a dog owner will only be legally responsible for the costs of a dog bite injury if he or she knew the animal had bitten before. 

An individual who files a personal injury lawsuit after a dog bite must show that he or she acted reasonably and carefully while the dog owner acted with negligence. For example, if you find yourself injured by a dog who is not on a leash in an area that requires leashes, you may have a successful claim. You must also show that the owner knew the animal had the capacity for aggressive behavior. 

In Nevada, a person must file a personal injury claim within two years of the incident. In some cases, the judge applies the modified comparative fault standard. This means that if your conduct partially contributed to the attack, the court will reduce your financial award for your injuries by your fault percentage.