Nevada and federal laws dictate the policies by which a company must abide when marketing to consumers. Straying from those guidelines could result in costly business litigation that cites deceptive trade practices, breach of contract and a host of other claims. A recent lawsuit from a couple who live near Reno illustrates what can happen when a business is not as forthcoming as it should be.

In June of last year, the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada was instructed to develop new rates regarding solar energy systems. The commission ruled in December 2015 that there would be increases in bills for people with solar power due to a raise in fees. Additionally, the credits that people who have these systems would earn would be lowered.

In August, between the time the commission was ordered to develop the rates and the time the ruling was final, a Nevada couple contracted with SolarCity to get a system. According to a lawsuit the couple filed, SolarCity did not alert them nor other customers to the pending new rates, leading these consumers to believe that the rates would remain low.

The lawsuit is aiming for class-action status for anyone who entered into a contract with SolarCity after June 5. It cites fraud, negligence, breach of contract and deceptive trade practices. The vice president of communications for SolarCity noted that the company guarantees rates, but it cannot control the actions of the commission. Anyone with questions about issues such as this should consult with an attorney.

Source: Vegas Inc, “Nevada solar customers sue SolarCity over marketing,” Daniel Rothberg, Feb. 8, 2016