If you are unhappy with the outcome of your family law case, you may be able to appeal the ruling. Generally, you can appeal an order from a judge if you believe that there were mistakes made during the case. Under the Nevada Rules of Appellate Procedure, you can appeal a number of items, including the following:

 

  •        An order concerning a motion for a new trial
  •        A final judgment
  •        An order concerning an injunction
  •        An order concerning an attachment

The Notice of Appeal must be filed in a timely matter in accordance to the court’s rules. In many cases, you may have as few as 30 days to challenge the decision.

An appeal also may not be your only option. When it comes to family law, many people choose to mediate a situation, developing and signing an agreement. That agreement, such as one for parenting time or property division, can be enforceable as law once a judge signs it. Yet, filing an appeal is not necessary if you determine that the terms of the agreement are no longer fair.

Under those circumstances, you will have to file a motion to go back to court, where a judge will listen to your concerns and hear from the other side as well. It is important to point out that changing an item such as one parent having sole custody can be difficult. In Nevada, you must be able to prove that there has been a significant change in circumstances and that changing the current situation is in the child’s best interests.

While this information may be useful, it should not be taken as legal advice.