If you have been bitten by a dog or have concerns about a dog in your Nevada neighborhood, it can be helpful to understand the dangerous dog classification in the state. A dangerous dog is classified as such based upon specific incidents of behavior stated by law. It is important to note that the breed of a dog alone will not label it as dangerous, as specified by the Nevada Legislature. In addition, vicious behavior that is provoked is often not held against the dog.

Law enforcement dogs are not subject to a dangerous dog label, but any other dog that has inflicted harm or killed a person is automatically considered vicious. A dog may also be considered a problem if it has behaved in a way that has caused you to have to defend yourself on at least two occurrences within an 18-month period when the dog was not on the owner’s property or otherwise confined.

In some cases, law enforcement can label a dog as being dangerous if its owner used it to commit a crime. However, if you are trespassing or trying to do harm and the dog attacks you to protect its owner or property, then the dog cannot be labeled dangerous or vicious based upon these actions.

Anyone who owns or keeps a dog that has been labeled as vicious or dangerous is committing a crime. Depending on the actions, a person could face misdemeanor or felony charges. This information is only intended to educate and should not be interpreted as legal advice.