For World Sleep Day (March 15), Ford underlined the connection between proper rest and safe driving with its “Sleep Suit.” Nevada residents who are curious should know that the suit will be integrated into the free driver training program Ford Driving Skills for Life. This is aimed at those aged 17 to 24. Incidentally, transport accidents are the No. 1 cause of death among young individuals.

Drowsiness, in particular, is behind up to one in five road accidents. Experts say that driving after 18 or more hours of wakefulness is comparable to driving while legally drunk. When drivers are drowsy, their brains may shut down involuntarily for brief periods of time, making them blind to the road. These are called microsleep episodes.

The Sleep Suit comes with goggles that simulate these episodes, which start off as half a second long and progressively grow to be 10 seconds in duration. The suit also consists of a cap, a vest and arm and ankle bands. Overall, the suit weighs more than 40 pounds.

Ford says that sleep is the only remedy for drowsiness. While drinking caffeinated beverages is helpful, it’s only a short-term remedy.

Someone who has been hurt by a negligent motorist may be wondering what their options are. If they are deemed less at fault for the crash than the other driver, then they can file a claim against that driver’s auto insurance company. This is where a lawyer may come in, strengthen the case with whatever proof of negligence there is and negotiate for a settlement.