Phones are a major source of distraction, as most drivers in Nevada know, and a recent online study has found out just what sort of phone-related distractions are common. Nearly 2,000 drivers across the country responded to the study, which was conducted by market research firm Wakefield Research, and it was calculated that these respondents use their phones daily for an average of 13 minutes behind the wheel.

Participating in group chats, such as text and email chains with multiple people, was the most distracting phone-related activity for 52 percent of respondents. Thirty-three percent mentioned social media, such as newsfeeds and, surprisingly, memes. Eighteen percent admitted that streaming shows, movie trailers and other videos frequently distracts them.

Yet few were ignorant of the fact that distracted driving is dangerous. Nearly half said it is a top concern for them when on the road, and 99 percent named phones among the top three driver distractions. Eighty-nine percent said they would give a bad rating to any ride-hailing driver who texted while driving, and 39 percent even admitted to doing so already.

When asked to compare their driving with those of ride-hailing employees, 90 percent said their own was better. This may partly account for the fact that nearly two in five respondents said they do not put down their phones when they see police.

Drivers are responsible for keeping their cars under control, and any distraction, from phone use to eating and drinking, lays drivers open to the charge of negligence. When negligence is behind car accidents, those who are innocent have the option of filing a claim and seeking compensation for their injuries, lost wages, pain and suffering and other economic and non-economic losses. This is where a lawyer, especially one with a network of crash investigators, may come in handy.