Nevada residents may be interested in the results of the 2019 Travelers Risk Index from the Travelers Companies. Based on a survey of more than 2,000 consumers and executives, it reveals some crucial data concerning distracted driving. Forty-four percent admitted to texting or sending emails, while 23 percent admitted to using social media. Twenty-two percent would record videos or take pictures behind the wheel.

Moreover, many drivers find it hard to break these habits. Thirteen percent said it about reading texts and emails, and 11 percent said it about sending them. Twelve percent of consumers set their phones to Do Not Disturb, while 41 percent choose not to turn it on. Thirty-five percent simply forget to turn it on or find it inconvenient to do so.

Workplace expectations can affect driver behavior. Travelers found that 87 percent of employers expect their employees to be reachable outside the office, and 20 percent of employees reply to work-related messages because of the pressure this creates. Three in four workplaces have distracted driver policies, but only 18 percent advise their workers to set their phones to Do Not Disturb.

Communication is essential in combating distracted driving. Fifty-four percent of respondents said they would stop driving distracted if someone asked them to. Yet 16 percent of consumers say they never speak up when riding with a distracted driver.

Victims of car accidents will want to know if they have grounds for a personal injury claim. In Nevada, those whose degree of fault is less than that of the defendant’s may be able to recover damages, which can include everything from medical expenses to lost income. Those who are eligible might opt to consult with an attorney and even hire him or her for the filing and negotiation stage. If a settlement cannot be agreed upon, the lawyer may litigate.