There are 7.4 million swimming pools in residential or public use in the U.S., according to the CDC. It’s important to keep pools safe because of the risk for drowning, especially among children: for every child under 14 who dies from drowning, five are sent to the emergency room for non-fatal submersion. Over 3,500 Americans die in non-boating drowning accidents every year.

For this reason, homeowners will want to consider the following three pool safety tips. The first is to secure the pool’s surroundings. A climb-resistant fence, at least four feet high and with no foothold or handhold for climbing, should be installed. Homeowners could also consider an alarm that detects surface motion in the pool.

Next is to set up clear pool safety rules not just for the family but also for guests. There should be no running, horseplay or riding tricycles or other toys around the pool. Trip hazards like flotation toys and electrical appliances like radios should be kept away. Everyone should know where the first-aid kit is.

Lastly, homeowners will want to prevent mechanical and chemical issues from arising. Dangerous chemicals should be labeled and locked away in a safe location. The suction fittings and plumbing grates should be securely in place, and the pool pump should be easy to reach in case of an emergency.

Homeowners have a duty of care to entrants. They can even be held responsible for any injuries done to child trespassers because a pool is considered an “attractive nuisance.” Victims who believe the accident they were in was preventable may benefit from consulting with an attorney who practices premises liability law. If the victim has valid grounds for a case, the lawyer might go ahead and hire professionals to investigate the case and gather proof supporting their side. The lawyer may then handle all subsequent negotiations.